Heritage and Tradition

Northwest Florida. Traditionalist. Twenty-two. Southern. Archaic.

-Celtic and Norse Culture

-Racial Science

-Southern Culture

-Conservative Politics

-Cabins and Nature

panic-at-the-discount-store:

I show affection for my pets by holding them against me and whispering I love you repeatedly as they struggle to escape from my arms

(via saraaasays)

meg-h4n:

sometimes it physically pains me to hold back my sarcastic comments 

(via the-wolf-and-the-mockingbird)

wellbehavedwomendomakehistory:

thisis-fat-privilege:

a-cellist:

thisis-fat-privilege:

https://imgur.com/a/5nXX9#0

An illustration of what fat acceptance, HAES and fat logic can do.

This is terrifying…. I’ve had patients do this, but never quite to this extent….

Do you ever just want to tell the patient that what they’re doing is absurd, and to give their fucking heads a shake? What are the rules on a cardiologist telling a patient that they’re patently wrong without getting into hot water?

Geez. even though it’s her own doing I can’t not feel bad for her.

"I have spent the last six months giving it all I have to lose weight and I have been successful in losing weight. I should be in the neighborhood of having lost about 340 pounds." Spent the entire time eating tons of junk food and refusing to try to walk or even roll over. Weight gained: five pounds.

I love what her doctor said in the end, though. He told it exactly like it was.

Take the Fair Face of Woman, and Gently Suspending, With Butterflies, Flowers, and Jewels Attending, Thus Your Fairy is Made of Most Beautiful Things by Sophie Anderson (1869).

Pro-choice isn't the same as anti-life. Anti-life is being against people living. Pro-choice is for letting a woman choose to be pregnant or not. Please understand this before you start spewing bullshit.
heritage-and-tradition heritage-and-tradition Said:

ethically-wrong:

rightwinged:

justprochoicethings:

What the anon said was definitely anti-life.

In the same breath, Sammy, you’ll go and call pro-lifers ”anti-choice” when they support many choices, including adoption, abstinence, and non-abortive birth control. The foundation of pro-choice ideology is that the unborn are not people and do not possess human rights, making them disposable. You do not value life, for if you did, you would find it unacceptable for a mother to even think of killing her child. You support “choice”, so you do not support life.

Well said!!

sixpenceee:

Déjà Vu

Déjà vu is the experience of being certain that you have experienced or seen a new situation previously – you feel as though the event has already happened or is repeating itself.

The experience is usually accompanied by a strong sense of familiarity and a sense of eeriness, strangeness, or weirdness. The “previous” experience is usually attributed to a dream, but sometimes there is a firm sense that it has truly occurred in the past.

Déjà Vécu

Déjà vécu is what most people are experiencing when they think they are experiencing deja vu.

Déjà vu is the sense of having seen something before, whereas déjà vécu is the experience of having seen an event before, but in great detail – such as recognizing smells and sounds. 

Déjà Visité

Déjà visité is a less common experience and it involves an uncanny knowledge of a new place. For example, you may know your way around a a new town or a landscape despite having never been there, and knowing that it is impossible for you to have this knowledge. 

Déjà Senti

Déjà senti is the phenomenon of having “already felt” something. This is exclusively a mental phenomenon and seldom remains in your memory afterwards.

You could think of it as the feeling of having just spoken, but realizing that you, in fact, didn’t utter a word.

Jamais Vu

Jamais vu (never seen) describes a familiar situation which is not recognized. It is often considered to be the opposite of déjà vu and it involves a sense of eeriness. The observer does not recognize the situation despite knowing rationally that they have been there before.

Chris Moulin, of Leeds University, asked 92 volunteers to write out “door” 30 times in 60 seconds. He reported that 68% of the precipitants showed symptoms of jamais vu, such as beginning to doubt that “door” was a real word. This has lead him to believe that jamais vu may be a symptom of brain fatigue.

Presque Vu

Presque vu is very similar to the “tip of the tongue” sensation – it is the strong feeling that you are about to experience an epiphany – though the epiphany seldom comes. 

L’esprit de l’Escalier

L’esprit de l’escalier (stairway wit) is the sense of thinking of a clever comeback when it is too late. 

Capgras Delusion

Capgras delusion is the phenomenon in which a person believes that a close friend or family member has been replaced by an identical looking impostor. This could be tied in to the old belief that babies were stolen and replaced by changelings in medieval folklore, as well as the modern idea of aliens taking over the bodies of people on earth to live amongst us for reasons unknown. This delusion is most common in people with schizophrenia but it can occur in other disorders.

Fregoli Delusion

Fregoli delusion is a rare brain phenomenon in which a person holds the belief that different people are, in fact, the same person in a variety of disguises. It is often associated with paranoia and the belief that the person in disguise is trying to persecute them.

It was first reported in 1927 in the case study of a 27-year-old woman who believed she was being persecuted by two actors whom she often went to see at the theatre. She believed that these people “pursued her closely, taking the form of people she knows or meets”.

Prosopagnosia

Prosopagnosia is a phenomenon in which a person is unable to recognize faces of people or objects that they should know. People experiencing this disorder are usually able to use their other senses to recognize people – such as a person’s perfume, the shape or style of their hair, the sound of their voice, or even their gait. A classic case of this disorder was presented in the 1998 book (and later Opera by Michael Nyman) called “The man who mistook his wife for a hat”.

SOURCE

(via the-wolf-and-the-mockingbird)

wtf-fun-factss:

Who discovered America first - WTF fun facts

(via norsedakotan)

aeonblacksun:

“Out of Africa” Theory Officially Debunked

Greg Jefferys explains that, “The whole ‘Out of Africa’ myth has its roots in the mainstream academic campaign in the 1990′s to remove the concept of Race.

They see no genetic proof substantiating an African precedence in the Homo sapien tree, and maintain that “a more plausible interpretation might have been that both current Africans and non-Africans descended separately from a more ancient common ancestor, thus forming a proverbial fork”.

There is absolutely nothing plausibly African turning up in any test tubes.

In fact, the researchers made note of their repeated absence stating “not one non-African participant out of more than 400 individuals in the Project tested positive to any of thirteen ‘African’ sub-clades of haplogroup A”.

It is now scientifically irrefutable fact that the “human species” has been found to contain a substantial quantity of DNA (at least 20%) from other hominid populations not classified as Homo sapien; such as Neanderthal, Denisovan, African archaic, Homo erectus, and now possibly even “Hobbit” (Homo floresiensis).

There are numerous other examples of where two separate species (for example with different numbers of chromosomes) can also produce viable offspring, yet are considered separate species.

A very recent paper on Y-chromosomes published in 2012, (Re-Examing the “Out of Africa” Theory and the Origin of Europeoids (Caucasians) in the Light of DNA Genealogy written by Anatole A. Klyosov and Igor L. Rozhanski) only confirms the denial of any African ancestry in non-Africans, and strongly supports the existence of a “common ancestor” who “would not necessarily be in Africa. In fact, it was never proven that he lived in Africa.”

(via nordvolk)

awildholler:

Sweet corn, grown with no pesticides or herbicides. My field is never tilled. I cover it with horse manure compost every fall, and I cover that with straw. When I weed it by hand, the weeds are left to decompose right in place as a mulch. Squash and beans grow alongside the corn, and everything is planted by hand.

It can be done. We don’t need Monsanto. We need human labor right there, side by side with the plants. We don’t need massive petroleum powered agriculture, we need people working small horticultural plots, gaining knowledge of their specific land and it’s needs. Our land needs to be enclosed by wild space, fecund and full of birds, and bats, and insects, and snakes, and turtles, and all of the other beings that make an ecosystem function.

We can make a desert of the earth in an attempt to get high yields of low quality crops so a few corporations can temporarily get great financial returns, or we can have people spend their days bringing their food into existence, getting in touch with their bio regions, and building healthy soil and ecosystems for generations to come.

It can be done.

(via spiritvs-evropa)

Rouge & Blanc Cocktail Dresses

(via the-wolf-and-the-mockingbird)